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"Look Out For Melting Hopes..."

Topic:
Frontrunner McKinley: A Defeated Napoleon
Source:
Harper's Weekly
Cartoonist:
William Allen Rogers
Date:
April 18, 1896, p. 385
Click for image enlargement and complete HarpWeek explanation >
Cartoonist William Allen Rogers used an apparently old political adage to illustrate the race for the Republican presidential nomination in 1896. The saying means that the politician who is doing well in the winter will likely see his stature thaw in the spring. Published in mid-April 1896, the cartoon predicts what will happen to the frontrunner status of Governor William McKinley in the face of intensely heated opposition from Thomas Platt, the political boss of New York Republicans. McKinley is depicted as Napoleon, whose protective ice is melting as Platt, with the head of the blazing sun and holding a spring flower, rises in the background. McKinley’s campaign motto was “The People Against the Bosses,” and Platt fought fervently, but unsuccessfully, against the governor’s nomination.
Click for image enlargement and complete HarpWeek explanation >

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