Abolition and Miscegination


 "Miscegenation or the Millennium of Abolitionism"
  Cartoonist:  Unknown
  Source:  Library of Congress
  Date:  c1864

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Complete HarpWeek Explanation:
The second in a series of anti-Lincoln satires by Bromley & Co.

The artist conjures up a ludicrous vision of the supposed consequences of racial equality in America in this attack on the Republican espousal of equal rights. The scene takes place in a park-like setting with a fountain in the shape of a boy on a dolphin and a large bridge in the background. A black woman (left), "Miss Dinah, Arabella, Aramintha Squash," is presented by abolitionist Senator Charles Sumner to President Lincoln. Lincoln bows and says, "I shall be proud to number among my intimate friends any member of the Squash family, especially the little Squashes." The woman responds, "Ise ‘quainted wid Missus Linkum I is, washed for her ‘fore de hebenly Miscegenation times was cum. Dont do nuffin now but gallevant ‘round wid de white gemmen! …"

A second mixed couple sit at a small table (center) eating ice cream. The black woman says, "Ah! Horace its-its-its bully ‘specially de cream." Her companion, Republican editor Horace Greeley, answers, "Ah! my dear Miss Snowball we have at last reached our olitical and social Paradise. Isn’t it extatic?"

To the right a white woman embraces a black dandy, saying, "Oh! You dear creature, I am so agitated! Go and ask Pa." He replies, "Lubly Julia Anna, name de day, when Brodder Beecher [abolitionist clergyman Henry Ward Beecher] shall make us one!" at the far right a second white woman sits on the lap of a plump black man reminding him, "Adolphus, now you’ll be sure to come to my lecture tomorrow night, wont you?" He assures her, "Ill be there Honey, on de front seat, sure!"

A German onlooker (far right) remarks, "Mine Got, vat a guntry, vat a beebles!" A well-dressed man with a monocle exclaims, "Most hextwadinary! Aw neva witnessed the like in all me like, if I did dem me!"

In the center a Negro family rides in a carriage driven by a white man with two white footmen. The father lifts his hat and says, "Phillis de-ah dars Sumner. We must not cut him if he is walking." Their driver comments, "Gla-a-ang there 240s! White driver, white footmen, niggers inside, my heys! I wanted a sitiwation when I took this one."

Many scholars believe that the word "miscegenation" was coined during the 1864 presidential campaign to discredit the Republicans, who were charged with fostering the intermingling of the races.

Source: American Political Prints, 1766 - 1876: A Catalog of the Collections in the Library of Congress, 1991, by Bernard F. Reilly, Jr.












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